×
×
homepage logo
STORE

Gov. Scott declares State of Emergency for Tropical Storm Emily

By Staff | Jul 31, 2017

In response to Tropical Storm Emily, Gov. Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency in multiple counties across the state, including Lee.

“Earlier this morning, Tropical Depression Six was upgraded to Tropical Storm Emily and tropical storm warnings are currently in effect along Florida’s west coast,” Scott said in a prepared statement issued by his office. “Upon learning of this tropical system from the National Hurricane Center, the State of Florida immediately engaged to prepare for any potential storm impacts. I have declared a state of emergency across 31 counties to ensure that every community has the resources they need, and that state, regional and local agencies can easily work together to keep people prepared during Tropical Storm Emily.

Tropical storm warnings are in effect for Lee County as well as Pinellas, Hillsborough, Manatee, Sarasota, and Charlotte.

At this time, there are no evacuation orders in effect however the Florida National Guard stands ready to assist with any storm related impacts, the Governor’s Office said.

“While this storm developed quickly overnight and will swiftly move across our state, storms can always develop rapidly and that is why is it so important to be prepared at the start of hurricane season,” Scott said.

“We will keep monitoring and issuing updates on Tropical Storm Emily as it moves across Florida today,” he added.

Lee County has not activated its Emergency Operations Center but its agencies are on storm watch.

“Lee County Emergency Management is actively monitoring the weather conditions and rainfall associated with Tropical Storm Emily to our north and reminds residents to drive safely in rainy conditions throughout the day as this system moves through,” said Lee Mayfield, acting director of Lee County Emergency Management in a prepared statement.

Lee County Department of Transportation is monitoring roads and ditches.

“DOT’s maintenance on drainage ditches has helped prepare the county’s roads for necessary drainage during rainfall events,” the county release states.

The county asks the public to report blocked ditches, swales, canals and areas of local flooding:

* First, to find out if the road is maintained by Lee County DOT, visit leegis.leegov.com/RoadLookup/. If it is not maintained by Lee County, find the municipal contact by visiting www.leegov.com/dcd/flood.

* Second, put in a Request for Action to improve surface water drainage along your county-maintained road by contacting the Request for Action Hotline at 239-533-9400 or www.leegov.com/dot/requestforaction.

* Individuals can use the same phone number and website to also report blocked creeks and streams (example: downed trees, collected debris). The reported information will be directed to Lee County Natural Resources.

Motorists who notice problems with traffic signals can contact the Traffic Operations Center at LeeTrafficTOC@leegov.com or call 239-533-5762.

Dangerous road debris can be reported to 239-533-9400.

“When approaching flooded intersections and roads, do not drive or walk through a flooded area if you cannot see the road surface beneath the water,” officials advised. “Keep your vehicle’s lights on and the flashers off.”

The South Florida Water Management District also offers drainage-related tips at www.sfwmd.gov/our-work/eoc-how-we-prepare.

“Remember, some standing water is normal after rain,”the release states. “Local lakes, ponds, swales, golf courses and even streets are often designed to temporarily collect excess water after heavy rainfall to keep it away from your home.”

Residents are also advised to stay away from fallen power lines.

“Assume that any line is conducting electricity,” the release states.

To report an emergency, such as downed or sparking power lines during a storm, call LCEC at 239-656-2300 or 1-800-599-2356 or FPL at 1-800-468-8243.

For more information, the Lee County All Hazards Guide may be found online at www.leegov.com/allhazardsguide

Gov. Scott declares State of Emergency for Tropical Storm Emily

By Staff | Jul 31, 2017

In response to Tropical Storm Emily, Gov. Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency in multiple counties across the state, including Lee.

“Earlier this morning, Tropical Depression Six was upgraded to Tropical Storm Emily and tropical storm warnings are currently in effect along Florida’s west coast,” Scott said in a prepared statement issued by his office. “Upon learning of this tropical system from the National Hurricane Center, the State of Florida immediately engaged to prepare for any potential storm impacts. I have declared a state of emergency across 31 counties to ensure that every community has the resources they need, and that state, regional and local agencies can easily work together to keep people prepared during Tropical Storm Emily.

Tropical storm warnings are in effect for Lee County as well as Pinellas, Hillsborough, Manatee, Sarasota, and Charlotte.

At this time, there are no evacuation orders in effect however the Florida National Guard stands ready to assist with any storm related impacts, the Governor’s Office said.

“While this storm developed quickly overnight and will swiftly move across our state, storms can always develop rapidly and that is why is it so important to be prepared at the start of hurricane season,” Scott said.

“We will keep monitoring and issuing updates on Tropical Storm Emily as it moves across Florida today,” he added.

Lee County has not activated its Emergency Operations Center but its agencies are on storm watch.

“Lee County Emergency Management is actively monitoring the weather conditions and rainfall associated with Tropical Storm Emily to our north and reminds residents to drive safely in rainy conditions throughout the day as this system moves through,” said Lee Mayfield, acting director of Lee County Emergency Management in a prepared statement.

Lee County Department of Transportation is monitoring roads and ditches.

“DOT’s maintenance on drainage ditches has helped prepare the county’s roads for necessary drainage during rainfall events,” the county release states.

The county asks the public to report blocked ditches, swales, canals and areas of local flooding:

* First, to find out if the road is maintained by Lee County DOT, visit leegis.leegov.com/RoadLookup/. If it is not maintained by Lee County, find the municipal contact by visiting www.leegov.com/dcd/flood.

* Second, put in a Request for Action to improve surface water drainage along your county-maintained road by contacting the Request for Action Hotline at 239-533-9400 or www.leegov.com/dot/requestforaction.

* Individuals can use the same phone number and website to also report blocked creeks and streams (example: downed trees, collected debris). The reported information will be directed to Lee County Natural Resources.

Motorists who notice problems with traffic signals can contact the Traffic Operations Center at LeeTrafficTOC@leegov.com or call 239-533-5762.

Dangerous road debris can be reported to 239-533-9400.

“When approaching flooded intersections and roads, do not drive or walk through a flooded area if you cannot see the road surface beneath the water,” officials advised. “Keep your vehicle’s lights on and the flashers off.”

The South Florida Water Management District also offers drainage-related tips at www.sfwmd.gov/our-work/eoc-how-we-prepare.

“Remember, some standing water is normal after rain,”the release states. “Local lakes, ponds, swales, golf courses and even streets are often designed to temporarily collect excess water after heavy rainfall to keep it away from your home.”

Residents are also advised to stay away from fallen power lines.

“Assume that any line is conducting electricity,” the release states.

To report an emergency, such as downed or sparking power lines during a storm, call LCEC at 239-656-2300 or 1-800-599-2356 or FPL at 1-800-468-8243.

For more information, the Lee County All Hazards Guide may be found online at www.leegov.com/allhazardsguide