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At the Library: New fiction books at the Captiva Memorial Library

By Staff | Sep 9, 2015

“Sisters of Heart and Snow”

by Margaret Dilloway

“The award-winning author of ‘How to Be and American Housewife’ returns with a poignant story of estranged sisters, forced together by family tragedy, who soon learn that sisterhood knows no limits. Rachel and Drew Snow may be sisters, but their lives have followed completely different paths. Married to a wonderful man and is a mother to two strong-minded teens, Rachel hasn’t returned to her childhood home since being kicked out by her strict father after an act of careless teenage rebellion. Drew, her younger sister, followed her passion for music, but takes side jobs to make ends meet and longs for the stability that has always eluded her. Both sisters recall how close they were, but the distance between them seems more than they can bridge. When their deferential Japanese mother, Haruki, is diagnosed with dementia and gives Rachel power of attorney, Rachel’s domineering father, Killian becomes enraged. In a rare moment of lucidity, Haruki asks Rachel for a book in her sewing room, and Rachel enlists her sister’s help in the search. The book, which tells the tale of real-life female samurai Tomoe Gozen, an epic saga of love, loss, and conflict during twelfth-century Japan-reveals truths about Drew and Rachel’s relationship that resonate across the centuries, connecting them in ways that turn their differences into assets” *

“Secrets of State”

by Matthew Palmer

“Sam Trainor had once been a whiz kid with a bright future, but a career of overseas work coupled with a penchant for being an outspoken iconoclast has once again left him on the outside looking in. Now he’s moving over from being the top South Asia expert in the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence & Research to doing identical work as a contractor ‘for twice the pay’ at Argus Systems, a Beltway Bandit consulting company with a lucrative contract to provide the federal government with intelligence and analysis on the subcontinent. But Sam soon discovers that for all their similarities, the government and private consulting companies have vastly different motives. As he struggles to adjust to a more corporate, profit-driven version of the work that had been his life, he stumbles across an anomaly in the intel the transcript of a phone conversation discussing the fastest ways to upend the delicate political balance keeping India and Pakistan from all-out war. Only he knows that conversation couldn’t have occurred because, among other things, he is having an affair with one of the participants. As he digs into the source of this misinformation, he realizes that more is at stake than just bad intel. Someone is deliberately twisting the intelligence to stoke the simmering conflict between India and Pakistan, nuclear-armed rivals that have already fought multiple wars. And Sam’s new employer could be up to its neck in it.” *

“Deadly Desires at Honeychurch Hall”

by Hannah Dennison

“Deadly Desires at Honeychurch Hall is the second charming and witty whodunit in Hannah Dennison’s amazing cozy series. Set at an English manor house, fans of British mysteries and Downton Abbey are sure to enjoy this contemporary take on murder at the manor house. When the body of a transport minister is discovered in the grounds on Honeychurch Hall, suspicion about his unusual demise naturally falls on the folks in the village. After all, who could possibly want a high-speed train line built in their front yard? News of the murder soon reaches our heroine Kat Stanford’s nemesis Trudy Wynne. A ruthless tabloid journalist and the ex-wife of Kat’s discarded lover, Trudy is out for revenge. She is also interested in exposing, and humiliating, Kat’s mother Iris, who is secretly the international bestselling romance writer Krystalle Storm. As the body count begins to build, Kat becomes inextricably embroiled in the ensuing scandal. Is the minister’s death the result of a local vendetta, or could it be connected to her mother’s unusual (to say the least) past?” *

“Her Name Is Rose”

by Christeen Breen

“People used to say Iris Bowen was beautiful, what with the wild weave of her red hair, the high cheekbones, and the way she carried herself like a barefoot dancer through the streets of Ranelagh on the outskirts of Dublin city. But that was a lifetime ago. In a cottage in the west of Ireland, Iris – gardener and mother to an adopted daughter, Rose – is doing her best to carry on after the death of her husband two years before. At the back of her mind is a promise she never intended to keep, until the day she gets a phone call from her doctor. Meanwhile, 19-year-old Rose is a brilliant violinist at the Royal Academy in London, still grieving for her father, but relishing her music and life in the city. Excited, but nervous, she hums on the way to an important master class, and then suddenly finds herself missing both of her parents when the class ends in disaster. After the doctor’s call, Iris is haunted by the promise she made to her husband – to find Rose’s birth mother, so that their daughter might still have family if anything happened to Iris. Armed only with a 20-year-old envelope, Iris impulsively begins a journey into the past that takes her to Boston and back, with unexpected results for herself and for Rose and for both friends and strangers. Intimate, moving, and witty, ‘Her Name is Rose’ is a gorgeous novel about what can happen when life does not play out the way you expect” *

“Beneath the Bonfire”

by Nikolas Butler

“Young couples gather to participate in an annual “chainsaw party,” cutting down trees for firewood in anticipation of the winter. A group of men spend a weekend hunting for mushrooms in the wilderness where they grew up and where some still find themselves trapped. An aging environmentalist takes out his frustration and anger on a singular, unsuspecting target. One woman helps another get revenge against a man whose crime extends far beyond him to an entire communitythe ten stories in this dazzling, surprising collection evoke a landscape that will be instantly recognizable to anyone who has traveled the back roads and blue highways of America, and they completely capture the memorable characters who call it home.” *

“The Dead Lands”

by Benjamin Percy

“a post-apocalyptic reimagining of the Lewis and Clark saga, a super flu and nuclear fallout have made a husk of the world we know. A few humans carry on, living in outposts such as the Sanctuary, the remains of St. Louis-a shielded community that owes its survival to its militant defense and fear-mongering leaders. Then a rider comes from the wasteland beyond its walls. She reports on the outside world: west of the Cascades, rain falls, crops grow, civilization thrives. But there is danger too: the rising power of an army that pillages and enslaves every community they happen upon. Against the wishes of the Sanctuary, a small group sets out in secrecy. Led by Lewis Meriwether and Mina Clark, they hope to expand their infant nation, and to reunite the States. But the Sanctuary will not allow them to escape without a fight.” *

“The Shore”

by Sara Taylor

“The Shore: a group of small islands in the Chesapeake Bay, just off the coast of Virginia. ‘The Shore’ is clumps of evergreens, wild ponies, oyster-shell roads, tumble-down houses, unwanted pregnancies, murder, and dark magic in the marshes. Sanctuary to some, but nightmare to others, it’s a place that generations of families both wealthy and destitute have inhabited, fled, and returned to for hundreds of years. From a half-Shawnee Indian’s bold choice to escape an abusive home only to find herself with a man who will one day try to kill her, to a brave young girl’s determination to protect her younger sister as methamphetamine ravages their family, the characters in this remarkable novel have deep connections to the land, and a resilience that only the place they call home could create.” *

* Book jacket/publisher description

-Senior Librarian Ann Bradley is branch manager Captiva Memorial Library.