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At the Library: Summer reading in full swing

By Staff | Jun 24, 2015

At 3 p.m. Wednesday, June 24, at the Captiva Memorial Library young audiences will sing-along and thrill as Katie Adams spins the big bold stories of Paul Bunyan, Sally Ann Thunder, Ann Whirlwind, Crockett and Pecos Bill.

Summer reading is in full swing so join in and read, read, read to earn points to provide meals and supplies for the injured animals at CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife). Teens and tweens too can read to provide meals and supplies for the injured animals at CROW. To unlock digital badges and earn points to make a difference for CROW, sign-up for summer reading online at leelibrary.readsquared.com

Many lives, many stories:

“I Must Say: My Life As a Humble Comedy Legend”

by Martin Short

“In this engagingly witty, wise, and heartfelt memoir, Martin Short tells the tale of how a showbiz-obsessed kid from Canada transformed himself into one of Hollywood’s favorite funnymen, known to his famous peers as the ‘comedian’s comedian.’ Martin Short takes you on a rich, hilarious, and occasionally heartbreaking ride through his life and times, from his early years in Toronto as a member of the fabled improvisational troupe Second City to the all-American comic big time of Saturday Night Live and memorable roles in movies such as ‘Three Amigos!’ and ‘Father of the Bride.’ He reveals how he created his most indelible comedic characters, among them the manic man-child Ed Grimley, the slimy corporate lawyer Nathan Thurm, and the bizarrely insensitive interviewer Jiminy Glick. Throughout, Short freely shares the spotlight with friends, colleagues, and collaborators, including Steve Martin, Tom Hanks, Gilda Radner, Mel Brooks, Nora Ephron, Eugene Levy, Catherine O’Hara, Paul Shaffer, and David Letterman. But there is another side to Short’s life that he has long kept private. He lost his eldest brother and both of his parents by the time he turned 20, and, more recently, he lost his wife of 30 years to cancer. In ‘I Must Say,’ Short talks for the first time about the pain that these losses inflicted and the upbeat life philosophy that has kept him resilient and carried him through. In the grand tradition of comedy legends, Martin Short offers a show business memoir densely populated with boldface names and rife with retellable tales: a hugely entertaining yet surprisingly moving self-portrait that will keep you laughing-and crying-from the first page to the last.” *

“Thirteen Soldiers: A Personal History of Americans at War”

by John McCain

“John McCain’s evocative history of Americans at war, told through the personal accounts of 13 remarkable soldiers who fought in major military conflicts, from the Revolutionary War of 1776 to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. As a veteran himself, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, and a long-time student of history, John McCain brings a distinctive perspective to this subject. ‘Thirteen Soldiers’ tells the stories of real soldiers who personify valor, obedience, enterprise, and love. You’ll meet Joseph Plumb Martin, who at the tender age of 15 fought in the Revolutionary War; Charles Black, a freeborn African American sailor in the War of 1812; and Sam Chamberlain, of the Mexican American War, whose life inspired novelist Cormac McCarthy. Then there’s Oliver Wendell Holmes, an aristocratic idealist disillusioned by the Civil War, and Littleton “Tony” Waller, court-martialed for refusing to massacre Filipino civilians. Each account illustrates a particular aspect of war, such as Mary Rhoads, an Army reservist forever changed by an Iraqi scud missile attack during the Persian Gulf War, and Monica Lin Brown, a frontline medic in rural Afghanistan who saved several lives in an ambushed convoy. From their acts of self-sacrifice to their astonishing bravery, these 13 soldiers embody the best America has to offer.” *

“But Seriously”

by John McEnroe

“John McEnroe is finally back and ready to talk once again. Since his hit book, he’s maintained a huge presence announcing at tennis’s majors, has guest starred in TV shows like ’30 Rock’ and ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm,’ and has been competing on the court, winning ATP Tour of Champions tournaments and playing in special events, exhibitions, and charity events around the globe. The beloved, controversial, and respected tennis legend reveals even more from his life and career with the signature style that has made him the enduring cultural figure and icon he is.” *

“The Good Son: JFK Jr. and the Mother He Loved”

by Christopher Anderson

“Critically acclaimed author, Christopher Andersen, is a master of celebrity biographies-boasting 16 bestsellers, among them, ‘These Few Precious Days,’ ‘Mick,’ and ‘William and Kate.’ Now, in his latest thrilling book, new and untold details of the life and death of JFK Jr. come to light. At the heart of ‘The Good Son’ is the most important relationship in JFK Jr.’s life: that with his mother, the beautiful and mysterious Jackie Kennedy Onassis. Andersen explores his reactions to his mother’s post-Dallas suicidal depression and growing dependence on prescription drugs (as well as men); how Jackie felt about the women in her son’s life, from Madonna and Sarah Jessica Parker to Daryl Hannah and Carolyn Bessette, to his turbulent marriage; the plane crash that took his life; and the aftermath of shock, loss, grief, and confusion. Offering new insights into the intense, tender, often stormy relationship between this iconic mother and son…” *

“Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis: The Untold Story”

by Barbara Leaming

“Barbara Leaming’s extraordinary and deeply sensitive biography is the first book to document Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’ brutal, lonely and valiant 31 year struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that followed JFK’s assassination. Here is the woman as she has never been seen beforewe witness a struggle that unfolded at times before our own eyes, but which we failed to understandalso makes clear the pattern of Jackie’s life as a whole. We see how a spirited young woman’s rejection of a predictable life led her to John F. Kennedy and the White House, how she sought to reconcile the conflicts of her marriage and the role she was to play, and how the trauma of her husband’s murder, which left her soaked in his blood and brains, led her to seek a very different kind of life from the one she’d previously sought. A life story that has been scrutinized countless times, seen here for the first time as the serious and important story that it is…” *

“Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget”

by Sarah Hepola

“For Sarah Hepola, alcohol was “the gasoline of all adventure.” She spent her evenings at cocktail parties and dark bars where she proudly stayed till last call. Drinking felt like freedom, part of her birthright as a strong, enlightened 21-century woman. But there was a price. She often blacked out, waking up with a blank space where four hours should be. Mornings became detective work on her own life. What did I say last night? How did I meet that guy? She apologized for things she couldn’t remember doing, as though she were cleaning up after an evil twin. Publicly, she covered her shame with self-deprecating jokes, and her career flourished, but as the blackouts accumulated, she could no longer avoid a sinking truth. The fuel she thought she needed was draining her spirit instead. A memoir of unblinking honesty and poignant, laugh-out-loud humorthe story of a woman stumbling into a new kind of adventure–the sober life she never wanted. Shining a light into her blackouts, she discovers the person she buried, as well as the confidence, intimacy, and creativity she once believed came only from a bottle. Her tale will resonate with anyone who has been forced to reinvent or struggled in the face of necessary change. It’s about giving up the thing you cherish most, but getting yourself back in return.” *

“Small Victories: Spotting Improbable Moments of Grace”

by Anne Lamott

“Anne Lamott writes about faith, family, and community in essays that are both wise and irreverent. It’s an approach that has become her trademark. Now Lamott offers a new message of hope that celebrates the triumph of light over the darkness in our lives. Our victories over hardship and pain may seem small, she writes, but they change us-our perceptions, our perspectives, and our lives. Lamott writes of forgiveness, restoration, and transformation – how we can turn toward love even in the most hopeless situations, how we find the joy in getting lost and our amazement in finally being found. Profound and hilarious, honest and unexpected, the stories in ‘Small Victories’ are proof that the human spirit is irrepressible.” *

* Book jacket/publisher description

-Senior Librarian Ann Bradley is branch manager Captiva Memorial Library.