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Lee voters back County Commission term limits, expanded School Board

By Staff | Nov 4, 2014

Voters opted to set term limits for Lee County commissioners and increase the Lee County School Board by two members Tuesday in the general election.

The ballot included a Lee County charter revision regarding setting consecutive terms for the Lee County Commission. It proposed limiting the number of four-year terms to no more than three terms. Voters approved the revision with 88.07 percent of the total votes cast, compared to 11.93 percent.

District 4 Commissioner Brian Hamman helped to initiate getting the proposal on the ballot.

“I knew that term limits was going to be very popular at the polls in Lee County,” he said Tuesday, adding that he did not expect it to be so popular. “It was one of the first initiatives that I came up with.”

Priding himself on being “the voice of the people,” Hamman explained that during his campaign he heard over and over from people that the Lee County Commissioner needed “fresh blood.”

“We gave them an opportunity to vote on it. The voters were extremely thrilled about that idea,” Hamman said. I’m just so happy I was a part of getting that on the ballot, so they could vote on it.”

Also on the ballot was a proposition to increase the Lee County School Board from five members to seven members, with five single-member districts. The two new seats would be elected countywide. Voters approved the proposition with 55.04 percent of the total votes, as compared to 44.96 percent against.

Incoming District 4 Lee County School Board Member Steve Teuber explained that most school districts are comprised of anywhere from seven members to nine members and that it is not uncommon.

“It wasn’t a surprise and it’s not unrealistic that we could use seven members,” he said.

Teuber cited better representation for the public as a pro of increasing the school board membership, but pointed out that candidates may only spend money in their district to get the votes they need.

“That creates fiefdoms,” he said. “We just need to be wary of that and make sure we’re doing what’s best for the children. We have to make sure we get good candidates.”

Lee voters back County Commission term limits, expanded School Board

By Staff | Nov 4, 2014

Voters opted to set term limits for Lee County commissioners and increase the Lee County School Board by two members Tuesday in the general election.

The ballot included a Lee County charter revision regarding setting consecutive terms for the Lee County Commission. It proposed limiting the number of four-year terms to no more than three terms. Voters approved the revision with 88.07 percent of the total votes cast, compared to 11.93 percent.

District 4 Commissioner Brian Hamman helped to initiate getting the proposal on the ballot.

“I knew that term limits was going to be very popular at the polls in Lee County,” he said Tuesday, adding that he did not expect it to be so popular. “It was one of the first initiatives that I came up with.”

Priding himself on being “the voice of the people,” Hamman explained that during his campaign he heard over and over from people that the Lee County Commissioner needed “fresh blood.”

“We gave them an opportunity to vote on it. The voters were extremely thrilled about that idea,” Hamman said. I’m just so happy I was a part of getting that on the ballot, so they could vote on it.”

Also on the ballot was a proposition to increase the Lee County School Board from five members to seven members, with five single-member districts. The two new seats would be elected countywide. Voters approved the proposition with 55.04 percent of the total votes, as compared to 44.96 percent against.

Incoming District 4 Lee County School Board Member Steve Teuber explained that most school districts are comprised of anywhere from seven members to nine members and that it is not uncommon.

“It wasn’t a surprise and it’s not unrealistic that we could use seven members,” he said.

Teuber cited better representation for the public as a pro of increasing the school board membership, but pointed out that candidates may only spend money in their district to get the votes they need.

“That creates fiefdoms,” he said. “We just need to be wary of that and make sure we’re doing what’s best for the children. We have to make sure we get good candidates.”