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Hurricane Irene: 11 a.m. update

By Staff | Aug 22, 2011

As of late Monday morning, Hurricane Irene was projected to hit along the Florida east coast by 8 a.m. Friday.

Ernie Jillson, a forecaster out of the Tampa Bay office of the National Weather Service, said Irene made landfall on Puerto Rico between 1 and 3 a.m. Monday morning and became a hurricane as it crossed Puerto Rico. John McMichael, also a forecaster out of the Tampa Bay office, said as of 11 a.m. hurricane Irene was about 105 miles west northwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico and was moving to the west northwest at 13 miles per hour. The winds are 80 miles an hour, which makes it a category 1 hurricane. The hurricane force winds are extending outward at about 30 miles from the core.

McMichael said the storm itself is expected to continue on this west northwest route for the next 24 hours. Later today, the core of Hurricane Irene should pass over the north of Hispaniola before reaching the Turks, Caicos Islands and the Southeastern Bahamas by late Tuesday.

“Further strengthening of the storm is expected,” he said, adding that it is predicted to become a major hurricane over the Bahamas by Thursday morning.

Hurricane Irene is expected to hit along the Florida east coast through 8 a.m. Friday. McMichael said Hurricane Irene is expected to continue to move towards the north northwest and affect the South Carolina coast on Saturday.

“That track is subject to change,” he said. “It is not etched in stone at all.”

McMichael said the uncertainty cone of 200 miles is still covering Southwest Florida as of 11 a.m.

“It could move either way,” he said.

Hurricane advisories will be issued every three hours for update activity and projected tracks of Hurricane Irene. An intermediate advisory will be given at 2 p.m. and a complete advisory will be given at 5 p.m.

McMichael encourages everyone to keep abreast of the latest forecast. He said individuals should also know their hurricane evacuation routes and make sure their hurricane kits are ready.

“Be prepared,” he said.

Hurricane Irene: 11 a.m. update

By Staff | Aug 22, 2011

As of late Monday morning, Hurricane Irene was projected to hit along the Florida east coast by 8 a.m. Friday.

Ernie Jillson, a forecaster out of the Tampa Bay office of the National Weather Service, said Irene made landfall on Puerto Rico between 1 a.m. and 3 a.m. Monday morning and became a hurricane as it crossed Puerto Rico.

John McMichael, also a forecaster out of the Tampa Bay office, said as of 11 a.m. hurricane Irene was about 105 miles west northwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico and was moving to the west northwest at 13 miles per hour.

The winds are 80 miles an hour, which makes it a category 1 hurricane. The hurricane force winds are extending outward at about 30 miles from the core.

McMichael said the storm itself is expected to continue on this west northwest route for the next 24 hours. Later today, the core of Hurricane Irene should pass over the north of Hispaniola before reaching the Turks, Caicos Islands and the Southeastern Bahamas by late Tuesday.

“Further strengthening of the storm is expected,” he said, adding that it is predicted to become a major hurricane over the Bahamas by Thursday morning.

Hurricane Irene is expected to hit along the Florida east coast through 8 a.m. Friday. McMichael said Hurricane Irene is expected to continue to move towards the north northwest and affect the South Carolina coast on Saturday.

“That track is subject to change,” he said. “It is not etched in stone at all.”

McMichael said the uncertainty cone of 200 miles is still covering Southwest Florida as of 11 a.m.

“It could move either way,” he said.

Hurricane advisories will be issued every three hours for update activity and projected tracks of Hurricane Irene. An intermediate advisory will be given at 2 p.m. and a complete advisory will be given at 5 p.m.

McMichael encourages everyone to keep abreast of the latest forecast. He said individuals should also know their hurricane evacuation routes and make sure their hurricane kits are ready.

“Be prepared,” he said.