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Reviving our river and estuary subject of Jan. 25 SCCF forum

By Staff | Jan 3, 2011

Water. It’s the vital to everything on the planet and essential to our day-to-day needs… especially the health of our Caloosahatchee estuary and the Everglades.

Unfortunately in our part of Florida, there is usually too much or too little and not enough of it is clean.

Join the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF) and Everglades Foundation in an interactive program entitled “Sugar and Salt: Our Beaches, Estuary and the Everglades Connection” at the third annual Conservation Forum at the Sanibel Community House, taking place on Tuesday, Jan. 25 at 7 p.m.

The program will include opening remarks by South Florida Water Management District Governing Board member Charles Dauray, brief presentations by Thomas Van Lent, Ph.D., Senior Scientist for the Everglades Foundation and Rae Ann Wessel, SCCF Natural Resource Policy Director.

The program will be followed by an interactive public participation discussion and question-and-answer session moderated by Kirk Fordham, CEO, Everglades Foundation.

Don’t miss this opportunity to learn more about the status of projects and funding to save the Caloosahatchee and advance Everglades restoration.

Following the program, attendees are invited to stay and visit with speakers at a reception to be held onsite.

The free program will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 25 at 7 p.m. at the Sanibel Community House, located at 2173 Periwinkle Way.

The Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation is dedicated to the conservation of coastal habitats and aquatic resources on Sanibel and Captiva and in the surrounding watershed through environmental education, land acquisition, landscaping for wildlife, marine research, natural resource policy, sea turtle conservation and wildlife habitat management. Community support through membership dues and tax-deductible contributions, in addition to grants and staff-generated revenue, makes this work possible.

Visit www.sccf.org for more details.

The Everglades Foundation is dedicated to protecting and restoring one of the world’s unique natural ecosystems, providing economic, recreational and life-sustaining benefits to the millions of people who depend on its future health. Through the advancement of scientifically sound and achievable solutions, the Foundation seeks to reverse the damage inflicted on the ecosystem and provide policymakers and the public with an honest and credible resource to help guide decision-making on complex restoration issues.

For more information, visit www.evergladesfoundation.org.