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Wood sculptor entering colossal shell at BIG ARTS

By Staff | Oct 2, 2009

Wes Roberts is a biologist by trade but an artist at heart.

He found a way to marry the two and the results is a larger-than-life wooden shell. The 150-pound wooden olive shell is made of exotic woods including, black walnut and epai – a Brazilian wood, Roberts said.

The piece is an submission to be juried for entry at BIG ARTS upcoming juried show for sculptors.

BIG ARTS is inviting sculptors to submit entries for its October Juried Sculpture Exhibit. Entries must be hand delivered to BIG ARTS Friday, Oct. 2, from 9 a.m. to noon; sculptures cannot be accepted prior to receiving day. More information is available at BIG ARTS office, or online at www.BIGARTS.org.

A Juror’s Talk with Mary Voytek, FGCU Sculpture Professor, College of Arts and Sciences, will be held in Phillips Gallery at 4 p.m. on Oct. 17 with artists reception to follow. The works will be displayed from Oct. 5 to Thursday, Nov. 12 at Phillips Gallery at BIG ARTS. Gallery times are Monday through Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m.

Entry fee for one submission is $25 for current members, $35 for non-members. The second and third entry is $5 for each additional work submitted. Artists are encouraged to bring their own pedestals. Wall sculpture must be ready to hang.

Phillip Gallery’s first dedicated sculpture exhibit is co-chaired by Jerry Churchill and Cornelia Reina. This exhibit will present fine art sculpture, as opposed to 3/D craft objects, according to a press report.

“I think we’re going to have a pretty solid display of sculptures,” said co-chair Jerry Churchill.

Churchill is elated about the exhibit because he said it gives an opportunity for fine sculptors and three dimensional artists to show their work.

Churchill said he will be submitting a paper mache piece of a purple howling canine and two bronze pieces.

Roberts and his son, David started the wood sculpting project four months ago in his garage studio on Sanibel.

“I always thought it would be nice to make a shell out of hard woods,” he said.

Roberts and his son out in 500 of hours of labor and about a grand of hard woods into creating the five and and a half foot tall shell. The piece will have to be carted in a wagon and fitted atop Roberts car to be delivered to BIG ARTS.

When the exhibit is over, the colossal shell will make its rounds in other statewide shows, Roberts said.

The museum quality piece is for sale and will be available to bring home after the exhibit and shows.

The Arts in the Tree Tops Gallery carries other sculpted pieces by Roberts.